Able individuals sometimes struggle to present themselves properly. As strange as this sounds, it’s frequently true. Whether through modesty or a lack of practise, we will bring you in for a 1 on 1 session on how to highlight your skills on paper, then how to present them when you are given the opportunity. Talking to someone about your strengths isn’t embarrassing. It’s a responsibility to tell someone else how you can improve their business – it’s what they want to hear! Through a refined process of analysis on CV structure, approach to engaging with interviewers and closure techniques on sealing the process, we share our knowledge to ensure that your strengths shine through. A CV is normally a 2 to 3 page document with a covering letter that highlights your specific skills and abilities and the previous experience you have to offer a prospective new employer. To present yourself successfully, you will need to document what employers are looking for in a candidate and arrange your most significant skills and experience as early as possible in your CV. This immediately demonstrates you are the ideal fit for the requirement. Try to reflect the job on offer to make it as easy as possible for an employer to match your skills with what they are looking for.

Reasons for leaving past posts: We would advise you not to put this on your CV. The decision to move is a complex and emotive issue and your statement might easily be misinterpreted. It is best to keep the CV positive and factual and leave this topic for discussion in an interview. Salary: It is advisable to omit your salary details from your CV. This is something that can be discussed at a more appropriate time, such as if you are granted an interview. Salary levels are dependent on many variables and they can be easily misconstrued, if you are not careful. Work Experience: Include work experience that highlights your skills and cover any gaps in your experience with an indicative comment, as these are often questioned. Provide a factual explanation for the gap time. If you are a recent graduate with little work experience, consider skills learnt at university through group projects, your own dissertation or thesis project and any volunteer work Any job will require skills that are not technically-orientated and will be dependent on the person involved, such as being able to communicate, meeting objectives, solving problems and fulfilling daily duties and responsibilities. Provide your honest opinion of your strengths in these areas - don't be afraid to assess yourself and to say you are good at something if it truly is one of your skills. Focus on how you can make a positive contribution to the new business with your personal skills.

For further guidance contact us now on 01502 693007